Research: RIPPE and COLLEAGUES,

Listed in Issue 255

Abstract

RIPPE and COLLEAGUES, 1. Rippe Lifestyle Institute, 21 North Quinsigamond Avenue, Shrewsbury, MA, 01545, USA. jrippe@rippelifestyle.com; 2. School of Health Sciences, Emory and Henry College, Emory, VA, 24327, USA conduct a review to evaluate findings from recent randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses into the relationship of sugar consumption and a range of health-related issues including energy-regulating hormones, obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and accumulation of liver fat and neurologic responses.

Background

The relationship between sugar consumption and various health-related sequelae is controversial. Some investigators have argued that excessive sugar consumption is associated with increased risk of obesity, coronary heart disease, diabetes (T2D), metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and stimulation of reward pathways in the brain potentially causing excessive caloric consumption.

Methodology

These concerns have influenced organizations such as the World Health Organization, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition in England not to exceed 5 % of total energy and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee 2015 to recommend upper limits of sugar consumption not to exceed 10 % of calories.

Results

Data from many randomized control trials (RCTs) do not support linkages between sugar consumption at normal levels within the human diet and various adverse metabolic and health-related effects. Fructose and glucose are typically consumed together in roughly equal proportions from high-fructose corn syrup (also known as isoglucose in Europe) or sucrose. The purpose of this review is to present data from recent RCTs and findings from recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses related to sugar consumption and its putative health effects. This review evaluates findings from recent randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses into the relationship of sugar consumption and a range of health-related issues including energy-regulating hormones, obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and accumulation of liver fat and neurologic responses.

Conclusion

Data from these sources do not support linkages between sugar consumption at normal levels within the human diet and various adverse metabolic and health-related effects. Conflict of interest statement: JM Rippeā€™s research laboratory has received unrestricted grants and Dr Rippe has received consulting fees from ConAgra Foods, Kraft Foods, the Florida Department of Citrus, PepsiCo International, Coca Cola, the Corn Refiners Association, Weight Watchers International and various publishers. TJA declares no competing interests

References

Rippe JM1, Angelopoulos TJ2. Sugars, obesity, and cardiovascular disease: results from recent randomized control trials. Eur J Nutr. 55(Suppl 2):45-53. Nov 2016. doi: 10.1007/s00394-016-1257-2. Epub Jul 14 2016.


Comment

Nota bene the conflict of interest statement above.

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