Research: RUDER and COLLEAGUES,

Listed in Issue 229

Abstract

RUDER and COLLEAGUES,  (1)Department of Sports Medicine and Nutrition, School of Health and Rehabilitation  Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: eruder@pitt.edu (2)Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; (3)Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; (4)Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire sought to determine whether increased antioxidant intake in women is associated with shorter time to pregnancy (TTP) among a cohort of couples being treated for unexplained infertility.

Background

Methodology

Secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Academic medical centre associated with a private infertility centre. Patients: Females with unexplained infertility. Interventions: None. Main Outcome Measure(S): The time it took to establish a pregnancy that led to a live birth.

Results

Mean nutrient intake exceeded the estimated average requirement (EAR) for vitamins C and E. No differences in mean intake of any of the antioxidants were noted between women who delivered a live-born infant during the study period vs. those who did not. In multivariable models, intake of β-carotene from dietary supplements was associated with shorter TTP among women with body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m(2) (hazard ratio [HR] 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.53) and women <35 y (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.01-1.41). Intake of vitamin C from dietary supplements was associated with shorter TTP among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03-1.15) and women <35 y (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.18). Intake of vitamin E from dietary supplements among women ≥35 y also was associated with shorter TTP (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.13).

Conclusion

Shorter TTP was observed among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2) with increasing vitamin C, women with BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) with increasing β-carotene, women <35 y with increasing β-carotene and vitamin C, and women ≥35 y with increasing vitamin E.

References

Ruder EH(1), Hartman TJ(2), Reindollar RH(3), Goldman MB(4). Female dietary antioxidant intake and time to pregnancy among couples treated for unexplained infertility. Fertil Steril. Mar 2014. 101(3):759-66. doi: 10.1016/j. fertnstert.2013.11.008. Epub Dec 17 2013.  Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT00260091.

Munro Hall Clinic 2019

IJCA 2018 New Skyscraper

Scientific and Medical Network 2

Cycle India 2020

Walk on the Wide Side Trek Kenya 2020

Big Heart Bike Ride South Africa 2020

top of the page