Research: RØSJØ and COLLEAGUES,

Listed in Issue 218

Abstract

RØSJØ and COLLEAGUES, (1)Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: egil.rorvik.rosjo@ahus.no.
(2)Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; KG Jebsen MS Research Centre, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
(3)Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Neurology, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway.

(4)Department of Neuroradiology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
(5)Multiple Sclerosis Centre Hakadal, Hakadal, Norway.
(6)Department of Medical Biochemistry, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children´s and Women´s Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
(7)Department of Neurology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
(8)Curato Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
(9)Department of Neurology, Molde Hospital, Molde, Norway; Unit for Applied Clinical Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
(10)Unilabs Drammen, Drammen, Norway.
(11)Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Helse Sør-Øst Health Services Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
(12)Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Registry and Biobank, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Competence Centre, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
(13)Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
(14)Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Research Institute of Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Section for Clinical Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Oslo University  Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; KG Jebsen Inflammatory Research Center, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
(15)Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway explored the relationships between vitamin A, D and E and inflammation in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

Background

Methodology

To explore the relationships between vitamin A, D and E and inflammation in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, the authors assessed their associations with 11 inflammation markers in 9 serial serum samples from 85 patients, before and during interferon-β1a treatment.

Results

A negative association was found between vitamin A and pentraxin 3 independent of interferon-β1a use, whereas positive associations between vitamin D and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and secreted frizzled-related protein 3 were seen before, and between vitamin E and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 16 during interferon-β1a treatment.

Conclusion

These findings suggest associations with diverse inflammatory pathways, which may be differentially influenced by interferon-β1a treatment.

References

Røsjø E(1), Myhr KM(2), Løken-Amsrud KI(3), Bakke SJ(4), Beiske AG(5), Bjerve KS(6), Hovdal H(7), Lilleås F(8), Midgard R(9), Pedersen T(10), Benth JS(11), Torkildsen Ø(12), Wergeland S(12), Michelsen AE(13), Aukrust P(14), Ueland T(13), Holmøy T(15). Increasing serum levels of vitamin A, D and E are associated with alterations of  different inflammation markers in patients with multiple sclerosis. J Neuroimmunol. 15;271(1-2):60-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2014.03.014. Epub 2014 Mar 24. Jun 2014.

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