Research: MASEREJIAN and COLLEAGUES,

Listed in Issue 199

Abstract

MASEREJIAN and COLLEAGUES, New England Research Institutes, Watertown, MA 02472, USA. nmaserejian@neriscience.com tested the hypothesis that carotenoid, vitamin C, zinc, and calcium intakes could be associated with LUTS and urinary incontinence in women.

Background

Whether lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), including voiding, storage, and urinary incontinence, are affected by dietary micronutrients is uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that carotenoid, vitamin C, zinc, and calcium intakes are associated with LUTS and urinary incontinence in women.

Methodology

During an observational, cross-sectional, population-based epidemiologic study of 2060 women (30-79 yr of age) in the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) survey (2002-2005), data were collected by validated food frequency questionnaire and in-person interviews and analyzed using multivariate regression. LUTS, storage, and voiding symptoms were assessed using the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUASI) and a validated severity index for urinary incontinence.

Results

Women who consumed high-dose vitamin C from diet and supplements were more likely to report storage symptoms, especially combined frequency and urgency (>= 500 vs < 50mg/d; odds ratio [OR]: 3.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-8.12). However, greater consumption of dietary vitamin C or beta-cryptoxanthin was inversely associated with voiding symptoms (p(trend) <= 0.01). Both dietary and supplemental calcium were positively associated with storage symptoms (eg, supplement >= 1000 mg/d vs none; OR: 2.04; 95% CI, 1.35-3.09; p(trend)=0.0002). No consistent associations were observed for beta-carotene, lycopene, or other carotenoids, although smokers using beta-carotene supplements were more likely to report storage problems. Whether the observed associations represent direct causes of diet on LUTS is uncertain.

Conclusion

High-dose intakes of vitamin C and calcium were positively associated with urinary storage or incontinence, whereas vitamin C and beta-cryptoxanthin from foods and beverages were inversely associated with voiding symptoms. Results indicate that micronutrient intakes may contribute to LUTS in dose-dependent and symptom-specific ways. Further study is needed to confirm these findings and their relevance to clinical treatment decisions.

References

Maserejian NN, Giovannucci EL, McVary KT and McKinlay JB. Intakes of vitamins and minerals in relation to urinary incontinence, voiding, and storage symptoms in women: a cross-sectional analysis from the Boston Area Community Health survey. Source European Urology. 59(6):1039-47. JunĀ  2011. Other ID Source: NLM. NIHMS283781 [Available on 06/01/12] Source: NLM. PMC3085565 [Available on 06/01/12].

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