Research: LACAILLE and KUVAAS,

Listed in Issue 212

Abstract

LACAILLE and KUVAAS, Institution Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Duluth, Minnesota, USA. rlacaill@d.umn.edu  investigated the relationship between CAM and herbal supplement utilization and coping, self-regulatory, cognitive styles, and healthcare satisfaction among US college students.

Background

Studies have suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and herbal supplement use may be high on college campuses. This study investigated the relationship between CAM and herbal supplement utilization and coping, self-regulatory, cognitive styles, and healthcare satisfaction among college students (n=370).

Methodology

Indeed, overall CAM and herbal supplement use during the past year appeared high; however, users of these practices appeared somewhat heterogeneous.

Results

Dispositional factors were predictive of utilization with active coping style associated with both practices, whereas support-seeking and intrinsic self-regulation were only associated with CAM use and avoidant coping was only related to use of herbal supplements. Notably, dissatisfaction with healthcare services was not associated with either CAM or herbal supplement use among students.

Conclusion

The findings from this study offer insight regarding motives for usage that may assist in more openly dialoguing with students regarding their health-enhancing and/or health-compromising behaviours. Moreover, future studies assessing utilization of CAM will benefit from examining the definitional issues of CAM practices that are addressed.

References

LaCaille RA and Kuvaas NJ. Coping styles and self-regulation predict complementary and alternative medicine and herbal supplement use among college students. Source Psychology Health & Medicine. 16(3):323-32. May 2011.

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