Research: GOODMAN and colleagues, F

Listed in Issue 21

Abstract

GOODMAN and colleagues, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington USA investigated the associations of baseline demographic, health history and nutritional information and prerandomisation serum concentrations of beta-carotene, retinol, retinyl palmitate and alpha-tocopherol in a random subset of 1182 smokers and asbestos-exposed workers, as part of the multicenter Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) lung cancer prevention study.

Background

Methodology

Dietary intake was estimated from a self-administered food frequency questionnaire.

Results

Supplemental vitamin use was the strongest predictor of each of the four vitamins analysed. There was a statistically significant inverse relationship between smoking and beta-carotene concentrations. Lower serum beta-carotene was associated with current smoking, higher daily number of cigarettes smoked and greater pack-years. Beta-carotene serum levels were higher with increasing years since stopping smoking, suggesting a biological mechanism for the lower serum concentration of beta-carotene in smokers. There were weak inverse associations between alcohol intake and serum concentrations of beta-carotene and retinol.

Conclusion

As shown in previous research, dietary intakes as measured by a food frequency questionnaire can only moderately predict serum concentrations of beta-carotene, retinol, retinyl palmitate and alpha-tocopherol. Goodman GE et al. The association between participant characteristics and serum concentrations of beta-carotene, retinol, retinyl palmitate and alpha-tocopherol among participants in the Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) for prevention of lung cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 5(10): 815-21 Oct 1996.

References

Munro Hall Clinic 2019

IJCA 2018 New Skyscraper

Scientific and Medical Network 2

Cycle India 2020

Walk on the Wide Side Trek Kenya 2020

Big Heart Bike Ride South Africa 2020

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