Research: CHARLTON and COLLEAGUES,

Listed in Issue 197

Abstract

CHARLTON and COLLEAGUES,  University of Derby, UK report the results of a questionnaire exploring the role, training and experience of a 'clinical reflexologist'.

Background

Methodology

The sample (n=105) was delegates at a clinical reflexology conference held at a major cancer treatment centre in the North West of England.

Results

The majority of participants had completed diploma level training (n=73) and were female (n=99). 62% (n=65) of the delegates had been practising for 6+ years and were practising in private practice, hospices and NHS settings amongst others. 40% (n=42) of participants actually worked across more than one of these settings. Respondents also reported working with a variety of healthcare concerns, including recovery from surgery, fertility, pain, smoking cessation and maternity and cancer care. Additional information was gathered related to training, referral rates from health professionals and access to professional and peer support. The questionnaire did not seek to explore what constitutes adequate training for clinical reflexology practice or respondents' view on whether being a registered nurse or allied health professional is a prerequisite for practising within a clinical environment. Additionally, caution must be taken with the reported findings as the respondents chose to attend the conference.

Conclusion

This survey has provided, for the first time, some interesting information/views on what constitutes 'clinical reflexology' and how some practitioners are developing their roles in healthcare settings. Further research work is warranted.

References

Charlton J, Mackereth P, Tiran D and Donald G. Take me to a clinical reflexologist: an exploratory survey. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. 17(2): 102-6. May 2011.

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