Research: BIRDEE and COLLEAGUES,

Listed in Issue 175

Abstract

BIRDEE and COLLEAGUES,  Osher Research Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. g2birdee@gmail.com  conducted a study in order to characterize the use of T'ai chi and Qigong for health with regard to sociodemographics, health status, medical conditions, perceptions of helpfulness, and disclosure of use to medical professionals.

Background

Little is known in the United States about those who practise T'ai chi and Qigong, two mind-body techniques that originated in Asia.

Methodology

The authors analyzed associations of T'ai chi and Qigong use for health using cross-sectional data from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Alternative Medicine Supplement (n = 31,044). The 2002 NHIS estimated the number of T'ai chi and Qigong users for health to be 2.5 and 0.5 million persons, respectively. The authors collapsed T'ai chi and Qigong use into a single category (TCQ) for analysis, representing 2.8 million individuals.

Results

The authors found that neither age nor sex was associated with TCQ use. TCQ users were more likely than nonusers to be Asian than white (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-3.15), college educated (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.97-3.03), and less likely to live in the Midwest (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.42-0.96) or the southern United States (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.36-0.72) than the West. TCQ use was associated independently with higher reports of musculoskeletal conditions (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.11-1.83), severe sprains (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.14-2.40), and asthma (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.08-2.10). Half of TCQ users also used yoga for health in the last 12 months. Most TCQ users reported their practice to be important to maintain health, but only a quarter of users disclosed their practice to a medical professional.

Conclusion

In the United States, TCQ is practised for health by a diverse population, and users report benefits for maintaining health. Further research is needed to establish efficacy and safety for target populations, including those with musculoskeletal and pulmonary disease, as well as for preventive health.

References

Birdee GS, Wayne PM, Davis RB, Phillips RS and Yeh GY. T'ai chi and qigong for health: patterns of use in the United States. Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine. 15(9): 969-73. Sep 2009.

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