Research: HAWKINS and COLLEAGUES,

Listed in Issue 287

Abstract

HAWKINS and COLLEAGUES, 1 Franklin School of Integrative Health Sciences, 504 Autumn Springs Court, Franklin TN, 37067, United States. j.hawkins@fsihs.org ;             2 Franklin School of Integrative Health Sciences, 504 Autumn Springs Court, Franklin TN, 37067, United States systematically reviewed the evidence related to the proposed link between lavender and tea tree essential oils  and endocrine disruption.

Background

Essential oils are common ingredients in personal care products; however, little is known about the effects of chronic exposure to these ingredients in human health. It has been suggested that these two essential oils [lavender LEO and tea tree TTEO]  cause prepubertal gynecomastia and premature thelarche [appearance of breast development] in children. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the evidence related to the proposed link between these essential oils and endocrine disruption

Methodology

This study sought to investigate the proposed link between LEO and TTEO and endocrine disrupting outcomes by identifying and evaluating the clinical evidence regarding this topic. Studies qualified if the participants included prepubertal children who have experienced either prepubertal gynecomastia or premature thelarche. The Case Series Critical Appraisal Tool (CSCAT) was used to identify the reliability of the identified case series. The potential for evidence of causality was evaluated using the tool proposed by Murad.

Results

A total of four manuscripts were identified, describing a total of eleven cases reported to have experienced both the exposure and the outcome. Reporting of inclusion, demographic data, clinical data, and the potential for causality was found to be insufficient. This study did not find evidence to support the claim that tea tree essential oil is related to endocrine disruption in children, and little to no evidence to substantiate the proposed link between lavender essential oil and endocrine disruption in children.

Conclusion

Because this potential link remains a concern among pediatric care providers and parents, epidemiological research to address the proposed link is needed.  Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

References

Jessie Hawkins  1 , Christy Hires  2 , Elizabeth Dunne  2 , Colby Baker  2. The relationship between lavender and tea tree essential oils and pediatric endocrine disorders: A systematic review of the literature. Complement Ther Med.;49:102288.  Epub Dec 20 2019. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2019.102288.  Mar 2020.

Comment

The above systematic review of research “did not find evidence to support the claim that tea tree essential oil is related to endocrine disruption in children, and little to no evidence to substantiate the proposed link between lavender essential oil and endocrine disruption in children.” Despite these findings and due to potential concern among health professionals and parents, they still recommend epidemiological research.

ICAN Skyscraper

Scientific and Medical Network 2

Cycle Around the World for Charity 2023

Climb Mount Kilimanjaro Charity 2023

Cycle from Milan to Venice for Regain 2023

top of the page